Volume 12, Issue 5 (2021)                   LRR 2021, 12(5): 53-79 | Back to browse issues page


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Wallace M, Chen W, Zhou S, Fu S. Self-identity Changes among Chinese EFL Undergraduate Students. LRR. 2021; 12 (5) :53-79
URL: http://lrr.modares.ac.ir/article-14-53842-en.html
1- Assistant Professor, Department of English, University of Macau, China , mpwallace@um.edu.mo
2- Research Assistant, Department of English, University of Macau, China
Abstract:   (601 Views)
Empirical studies examining the effects of language learning have largely focused on linguistic changes in learners. Regrettably, this has left the non-linguistic changes under-researched. To address this, the current study examined what self-identity changes Chinese university EFL learners experienced and how individual characteristics (i.e., gender, starting age of study, and university major) may have affected these changes. To do so, a self-identity change questionnaire was administered online to 416 Chinese university students using a convenience sampling strategy. Seven identity change variables were measured by the survey: changes in (1) positive self-confidence, (2) negative self-confidence, (3) productive identity change, (4) additive identity change, (5) zero change, (6) subtractive change, and (7) split change. Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed that the items on the questionnaire measured their intended identity change variable. Descriptive statistics showed that participants experienced changes in self-confidence, additive identity, and productive identity, but did not experience subtractive or split change. The results also showed that the participants were unaware that they had experienced any changes. Multiple analysis of variance results showed that the individual characteristics contributed to some variation in the identity changes. The findings support theories suggesting that language learning contributes to non-linguistic changes within learners.  
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Article Type: Research article | Subject: English language
Published: 2021/12/1

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